Carthusian Monastery

Occupying extensive lands south of Hospital Street and west of King Street, the Carthusian Priory in Perth was the only one in Scotland, was founded in 1429 by James I (1406–1437). The  foundation of a Carthusian or Charterhouse Monastery is recorded on the obelisk in the rounds, on the corner of King Street and Hospital Street. Further details are on the information board 'The Vale of Virtue' on Hospital Street, panel 10 of the PKHT Medieval Trail. The Carthusian Order  is an enclosed order of both monks and nuns. The Carthusians are the most ascetic and austere of all the European monastic orders…

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Blackfriars Monastery

This plaque at the corner of Charlotte Street and Blackfriars Street sets out three important dates in the history of Blackfriars Monastery. It was thought to have been founded King  Alexander II in 1231. The Church of the Friars Preachers of Blessed Virgin and Saint Dominic at Perth, commonly called “Blackfriars”, was a mendicant friary of the Dominican Order.  Mendicant were Christian religious orders who adopted a lifestyle of poverty, traveling, and living in urban areas for purposes of preaching, evangelization, and ministry, especially to the poor. At their foundation these orders rejected the previously established monastic model. The friary was frequently…

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St Leonard’s Priory

Also known as the Nunnery of St Leonard the Abbot, this nunnery first recorded in 1411 was occupied by both nuns and monks. When the Carthusian Monastery  was established in 1429, it suppressed the nunnery. The lands of the nunnery were conferred on the Carthusian Monastery who continued the chapel under its patronage. Following the dissolution of the monasteries the lands were acquired many years later by the Glover Corporation. The plaque showing the site of this nunnery is on the old Salmon Fisheries Building on St. Leonard’s Bank. The land is now much changed due to the construction of…

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Sir James McKenzie

Sir James, who was born in this cottage at Pictstonhill Farm, became a famous cardiologist. While working in general practice in Burnley he developed theories relating to heart diseases. He devised surgical instruments to measure heart function and was responsible for the introduction of digitalis to control heart malfunction. Sir James was responsible for the establishment of the Military Heart Hospital where he acted as a consultant during the First World War. He was Knighted in 1915, aged 62.

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Sir Patrick Geddes Obelisk

An obelisk, standing in the gardens of the Rodney Pavilion, was erected in memory of Sir Patrick (1854-1932) who spent his childhood in a cottage on Mount Tabor Road. Adjacent to the obelisk is a plaque which explains the symbolism on the obelisk, symbols which  encompass the range of Sir Patrick’s interests. Sir Patrick Geddes is principally renowned for his work as a pioneer of town planning. Due to his interest in the biological sciences he held a lectureship in botany at Aberdeen University and later, the chair of Botany at Queen’s College Dundee. He also held the chair of…

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David Douglas Memorial

David Douglas (1799-1834), the botanist, was born in Scone and attended Kinnoull School. Initially working as a gardener at Scone Palace, he became a plant hunter travelling extensively in Northwest America, Hawaii and Canada.  He is famous for the introduction to Great Britain of a variety of plant species particularly the Douglas fir. Lists of other species he introduced are to be found on the monument. He died on Hawaii aged 35 in 1834. He was when gored by a bull after he fell into a pit into which the bull had also stumbled.

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Perth Waterworks

The Waterworks were designed and built (1829-1832) under the supervision of Adam Anderson, then Rector of Perth Academy (1811 to 1839). Adam Anderson also designed Perth Gas works. As an academic he was responsible for a considerable body of research dealing with atmospheric phenomena and the utilisation of gases and other fuels. Following his tenure at Perth Academy he moved to St Andrews University when appointed Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy. He died in St Andrews in 1846. His grave in Greyfriars Churchyard is marked by an obelisk. The building housed steam driven pumps which drew water through suction…

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Bowerswell House – War Memorials

Bowerswell House Memorial Homes feature a number of war memorials. A memorial window is dedicated to the fallen of Perth from World War 2. An obelisk within the grounds celebrates 50 years of peace, remembering those who lost their lives. The refurbishment of the House and its surroundings in 1991 are remembered in further plaques and there is a framed award by Perth Civic Trust. See also Bowerswell House - Effie Gray.

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