The Guildry Plaques on Tay Street

A series of six metal plaques are set on the top of the riverside flood wall on Tay Street, just north of the viewing platform. The plaques were funded by the Guildry Incorporation and describe various elements of the civic history of Perth. The first plaque records the visit of James VI in April 1601, before he became King of the United Kingdom. It records how much he was made welcome with ‘much wine’ and ‘a banquet’ but this was less than a year since an attempt had been made on his life while he resided at Gowrie House in…

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King James VI Hospital

An information board (panel 10 of the PKHT Medieval Trail) explains the history of the Hospital. A Hospital at that time could be described as an early form of Poor House. It was built on the site of a Carthusian Monastery A royal charter in 1569 during the regency of the Earl of Moray established a hospital in Perth. The 1587 date on the building refers to a second royal charter by King James VI when he become old enough to rule, although buildings were not erected until 1596. The original buildings were not on the present site but close to…

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Carthusian Monastery

Occupying extensive lands south of Hospital Street and west of King Street, the Carthusian Priory in Perth was the only one in Scotland, was founded in 1429 by James I (1406–1437). The  foundation of a Carthusian or Charterhouse Monastery is recorded on the obelisk in the rounds, on the corner of King Street and Hospital Street. Further details are on the information board 'The Vale of Virtue' on Hospital Street, panel 10 of the PKHT Medieval Trail. The Carthusian Order  is an enclosed order of both monks and nuns. The Carthusians are the most ascetic and austere of all the European monastic orders…

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St Ann’s Lane and Chapel

A small green plaque at the South Street entrance to St. Anne’s Lane which runs north to St John’s Kirk tells the history of this ancient Kirk Vennel. It passed in part through the medieval graveyard next to the Chapel of St. Ann, which held a number of altars dedicated to the Mother of the Virgin. The chapel acted as a hospital for travellers and the poor. The chapel was in existence in 1514 when prayers were said every Tuesday for the soul of James VI who fell at Flodden the previous year. (Marshall T. H., The History of Perth:…

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The Old Ship Inn

A notice board suggests an Old Ship Inn has been on this site in the Skinnergate since Medieval times. The present building is described by Gifford as late-Victorian. The Inn was close to the Old Mercat Cross where presumably there were lots of customers on market days. The building also displays a series of boards showing mock newspaper headlines relating to events occurring within the life-time of the public house.

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